Alzheimer’s ApoE Genetic Test

Whether you are 35 or 75, your Alzheimer’s genetics stay the same. It is never too early or too late to learn your genetic risk for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease.

About the test

The Alzheimer’s ApoE Genetic Test looks for the most common inherited genetic risk associated with late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (occurring after the age of 65) – the ApoE gene. The ApoE gene comes in three forms: ApoE-e2, ApoE-e3, and ApoE-e4 and each person has two copies – one from each parent. Having one or two copies of the ApoE-e4 form increases your risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Having one or two copies of the ApoE-e2 form decreases your risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease.

Having an increased risk does not mean that you will definitely develop Alzheimer’s disease and having a decreased risk does not mean that you will not develop the disease. It is important to note that genetics makes up only part of your risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease and there are many things that you can do to decrease your risk.

What will the test tell me?

The Alzheimer’s ApoE Genetic Test looks for the most common inherited risk associated with Alzheimer’s disease. The results will tell you:

  • The two copies of the ApoE gene that you inherited
  • If you have an increased risk for developing late-onset Alzheimer’s Disease
  • How your lifetime risk for developing late-onset Alzheimer’s disease changes as you age

*Please note that this test does not look for rare genes associated with early-onset Alzheimer’s (PS1, PS2, or APP), which tends to occur at very young ages. Please speak with your physician to learn more about these rare genes.

Why should I take this test now?

Changes begin happening in the brain about two decades before the first symptoms of memory decline. Many factors impact your brain health including: genetics, lifestyle, environment, age, and other medical conditions. Knowing if you have an increased genetic risk gives you time to consider your options and make changes in your life to increase your risk. For individuals with an increased risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease, early action may make a difference.

No matter what your genetic risk is, knowing your risk can help you decide how aggressively you want to make changes to maintain your cognitive health.

For more information:

Email amckeany@adxhealthcare.com to learn more about ApoE genetic testing.